Pale ales and cheese

Pale Ales

LLast night was our very first Beer Club. Acclaimed writer Pete Brown took over the Beer For That Twitter account between 7pm and 8pm and we asked you to have your burning pale ale questions at the ready. You totally delivered. We received hundreds of tweets from around the globe enabling Pete to offer his expertise on pale ale history, food matches, characteristics, alternatives and much, much more.

 

You were quick out of the blocks too. First up Alexandra who, judging from her tweet, was primed for Beer Club in the pub. She was after pale ale alternatives.

 

  Gareth wanted the beer style nitty gritty.

 

With so many quality IPA’s available choosing just one is impossible.

 

There was realisation followed by contemplation from Stuart.

 

Could it be possible that, actually, all beers are pale ales?

 

In the end you made Pete hungry and thirsty.

 

And for those stuck for Christmas present ideas Beer Club had it covered.

 

It was a cracking inaugural Beer Club and enormous thanks go out to all who joined in. Pete’s expert tips and analysis armed people with enough information about pale ales so that when they’re next in the pub and a friend orders a Marston’s Pedigree, they can confidently proclaim “A delightful pale ale. It’s actually the lightly toasted barley malt that gives it that pale colour and delicate biscuity cereal flavours you know”.

 

Next week’s Beer Club looks at stouts with Ben McFarland, one half of authors and performers Thinking Drinkers. If you’re not sure what a stout is, want to know more about its history or would like to know what makes a stout a stout, join us on Wednesday December 10th at 7pm and have your questions ready. In the meantime you could try these. Call it revision.

 

Young’s Double Chocolate Stout, Guinness Foreign Extra Stout or Camden Town Brewery Camden Ink Stout.

 

If you’d like to kept up to date on Beer Club and the rest of the Beer For That campaign activity (have you tried #BeerMatch yet?) sign up to our newsletter here.

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